erin-feldman

Erin Feldman – Write Right

I’m a writer and editor of Write Right. Need I say more? Of course, I do. I help people, primarily fiction authors, get their manuscripts to publishable quality.

 

WHAT LED YOU TO START WORKING IN DIGITAL/MEDIA PUBLISHING?

You could call it practicality. I’m creative with a huge dash of logic thrown in, so when I went to graduate school to study creative writing — with a poetry emphasis! — I knew I needed to consider my career options. I ended up in marketing communications because a) I didn’t want to become a high school teacher; b) I wanted to create useful content, and b) I held an existing interest in advertising and graphic design. Marketing and digital media seemed like the best outlet, which it has been.

 

WHAT DOES A TYPICAL DAY LOOK LIKE FOR YOU?

I’m up at 5 am to workout. It clears my head a lot of times and helps me tinker with a particular phrase or upcoming project. Breakfast occurs around sixish, and I’ve usually hit at least one writing or editing assignment by 7 am. I work best in the mornings, so I try to use that time as much as possible to get things done. Technically, my day could end around 2 pm, but I stay online to check email and look for new work opportunities until 4 or 5 pm.

 

WHAT’S YOUR WORK SETUP LOOK LIKE?

I’m a hybrid in perhaps all senses. I use a Mac for most things but also own a PC that contains all my design tools—speaking of which, I use Adobe’s Creative Suite to touch up my drawings or turn them into a full-length journal or coloring book. In terms of productivity tools, I work with a couple of apps because of client’s varying needs. The tools include Basecamp, Asana, Trello, Evernote, and Slack. The Google calendar proves useful, too, but I always support the online calendar with a wall one and a handwritten, daily to-do list. Oh, I’m also a big fan of folders and bookmarks. I use them to organize research materials more often than I employ Evernote. Folders are a lifesaver for Word documents and other files, too. One of my graphic design/web design professors drilled folders into me during a Dreamweaver course, so let’s blame her for my compulsive use of them.

 

WHAT DO YOU DO OR GO TO GET INSPIRED?

I’m not really a fan of “getting inspired,” so I suppose I’m part of the Jack London crowd: you go after inspiration with a club. (I also use, “This is Sparta!” semi-regularly, so I’m more about doing the work and letting the inspiration come — if it comes — as I sit at the desk and write.) However, other people’s writing, art, dance, exercise, and music are good sources of inspiration for me. Almost anything can be inspiring; you just have to live your life and pay attention to what’s going on around you. An art exhibit I saw a few months ago put the thought this way, “What is art? Close observation.”

 

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PIECE OF WRITING OR QUOTE?

Oh, dear. I warn people not to ask this question because they’ll lose hours of their life, if not get sucked into a black hole. If we’re talking nonfiction, one of my favorite books is Luci Shaw’s Breath for the Bones. I also love Makoto Fujimura’s Refractions. I’ll leave fiction and poetry alone since we’ll be here all day if I start talking about them.

 

WHAT IS THE PASSIONATE PROBLEM YOU ARE TACKLING AT THE MOMENT?

I’m not sure if a coloring book counts as a “problem,” but it’s the project I’m tackling at the moment. I want to get my second one finished and published before the end of the year.

 

Is there a Product, Solution, or Tool that you think is a Good Match For Your Digital Publishing Efforts?

Three come to mind: WordPress, MailChimp, and Instagram. I use Twitter, too, but it’s not the same network as it was two or three years ago. WordPress is my CMS; MailChimp acts as both a newsletter platform and RSS feed; and Instagram lets me share books, art, and other important matters, such as my faith and what it’s like to live with type 1 diabetes.

 

ANY ADVICE FOR AMBITIOUS DIGITAL PUBLISHING AND MEDIA PROFESSIONALS JUST STARTING OUT?

I would encourage them to pay attention, read (or look at photos and designs) a lot, and hone their craft. Also, they shouldn’t expect to ever “make it.” Stay humble, and they’ll go farther than they ever thought they could.


Founder and Editor in Chief of State of Digital Publishing and Seek An Audience. My vision is to provide digital publishing and media professionals a platform to collaborate and promote their efforts, my passion is to uncover talent and the latest trends for all to benefit.


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